Launch Day for Bitterroot Lake!

You know how you know a particular event is going to happen—say, your wedding day or a big trip—but it’s so far away, it doesn’t seem real, and then, all of a sudden, here it is?

Bitterroot Lake

That’s what launching a book is like.

Today, please welcome Bitterroot Lake, by my other self, Alicia Beckman. It’s out today in hardcover, ebook, and audio (narrated by the amazing Linda Jones). 

When a young widow returns to her family’s lakeside Montana lodge in search of solace, murder forces her to reconnect with estranged friends and confront everything she thought she knew about the tragic accident twenty-five years ago that tore them apart. 

I want to acknowledge that this is still a difficult time, a time of loss and grief for so many, and it feels a little strange to be celebrating a book launch. And yet, we are all readers here and we know what comfort books have brought us this past year.

I hope a few hours in an imaginary lodge on an imaginary lake outside an imaginary town in NW Montana will bring you some much-needed pleasure.

And a bit of armchair travel is always a welcome break. 

I’ve long wanted to write a book focused on women’s friendships—although if you read my Spice Shop mysteries, you know female friendships are central to the books, especially The Solace of Bay Leaves. And the historic lodges of western Montana, public and private, have fascinated me since I first set tender foot in them as a young girl. I’m sure I’m not alone in believing that places convey emotions, and that houses and the woods sometimes talk to us. All that and more come together on these pages. 

If you’d like to see some of the images that inspired me, take a peek at my Pinterest board, Life at Bitterroot Lake. 

Whether you’re part of a book club or read solo, I hope you’ll find some food for thought on the For Book Clubs page of my website. 

Thank goodness libraries, booksellers, and community groups around the region are welcoming authors and readers to their virtual spaces. I’ll be doing quite a few online events this spring, by myself and with other authors, to celebrate the launch of Bitterroot Lake. The full schedule is on my website.

And today, I’ll be posting several short videos, taking you behind the scenes on launch day, on my Facebook Author page, going live at 5 pm Mtn / 7pm E, when I’ll toast you all with the ritual pink champagne and give you a peek at my office!

It is a bit unnerving to send a book out into the world. Any book or story, but especially something new. A piece of ourselves goes out with every project. All I can do is sit here and wave, and wish it well, and hope you love it the way I do. Let me know, and if you like it, tell your friends. 

My thanks, as always, for joining me on this writing journey. 

From my heart,
Leslie 

PRAISE FOR BITTERROOT LAKE 

“A complex, richly imagined, atmospheric mystery,  Bitterroot Lake kept me guessing whodunit until the very end.”
—A. J. Banner, #1 bestselling author of The Good Neighbor

Atmospheric, character-driven, and truly absorbing, Bitterroot Lake is crime fiction at its finest.
—Christine Carbo, award-winning, best-selling author of the Glacier Mystery Series

Bitterroot Lake is a twisty, haunting thriller propelled by a delicious hint of otherworldliness. It’s a book that’s both an expert mystery and an affirmation of love and family. I was absolutely enthralled.”
—Emily Carpenter, bestselling author of Burying the Honeysuckle Girls

“With a rich sense of place and a deft handling of fractured relationships, the pull of the past, and the pain of new grief, Alicia Beckman weaves a satisfying tale of secrets and lies eating away under the surface of happy families and close-knit small towns. And a touch of magic too!”
—Catriona McPherson, Edgar-nominated author of Strangers at the Gate

“Beckman paints a gorgeous picture of an idyllic small town. With some paranormal aspects, secrets past and present, and a multitude of murder suspects, this suspense debut is sure to attract readers.”
—Library Journal

The Saturday Creativity Quote

Tranquility, oil on canvas, Tabby Ivy (collection of the author)

“Those who are willing to be vulnerable move among mysteries.”

— Pulitzer Prize-winning American poet Theodore Roethke (1908-63)

Now, we know the poet wasn’t talking about writing the mystery genre; he was talking about the truths that come to us when we quiet our minds, open our hearts, and do our creative work. May you know that vulnerability and mystery in these next few days.

Celebrating Bitterroot Lake — it’s (almost) Book Launch Week!

Bitterroot Lake

Launch Day is almost here! BITTERROOT LAKE, my suspense debut written as Alicia Beckman, launches next week, Tuesday, April 13. Since we can’t get together in person for the usual book talk or interview, I want you to know where you can find me online this next week, and where you can read guest blogs I’ve written and interviews with me. Of course, you can find the full list of events and where to buy the book on my website.

Tuesday, April 13, 9:00 am
On the Air with the KGEZ Good Morning Show
KGEZ AM 600 FM 96.5
KGEZ.com listen live/on-demand
Research for fiction? You mean you don’t just make everything up?

Thursday, April 15, noon Mtn/2 pm E
Molly on Mysteries
Chatting with Mystery Maven Molly Weston
Go to Mycary.org (a network of the town of Cary NC, but Molly says, “ANYONE FROM ANYWHERE is welcome.” Create a profile, search programs for “Molly on Mysteries” and choose me!)

Saturday, April 17, 11 am Mtn
Book Carnival Bookstore, Orange CA
Chatting mystery and celebrating our new releases with cozy author Emmeline Duncan

Saturday, April 17 – 1:00-2:00 pm
Bigfork Art & Cultural Center
“Meet the Author”
A safe & socially-distance drop-in signing (no reading)

If you’re curious about the origins of this book, the pen name, or the process of writing it, I hope you’ll enjoy these Interviews and guest posts:

Writers Who Kill – interview Interviewer Elaine Davis asks great questions—and I love that she didn’t realize Alicia is me, even though she’s reviewed at least two of my cozies!

The Big Thrill – interview Interviewer Terri Nolan of the International Thriller Writers got me thinking with her quesions.

Poisoned Pen Bookstore blog Librarian and reviewer Lesa Holstine asked me to write about the backstory—the origins of Bitterroot Lake.

And for my good friends at the Wicked Cozy Authors, I talked about creating an entirely fictional town and working with graphic artist and painter Francesca Droll to create the map inside the book.

Finally, let me share this marvelous review from Kristopher Zgorski of BOLO Books. It’s enormously gratifying when a reviewer truly gets what an author is doing with a book, especially when it’s a little different from previous books, and maybe even sees a few things the author didn’t! Kristopher won the Mystery Writers of America’s Raven Award for his work a few years ago, and his kind words touch me deeply.

I hope you’ll pick up or order a copy of Bitterroot Lake, in hardcover, ebook, or audio, at your usual online or independent bookseller, and let me take you on a journey to the water’s edge.

Leslie

Celebrating Bitterroot Lake — upcoming book talks & events

Bitterroot Lake

Ah, for the good old days of actually holding book launches in bookstores and libraries and art galleries! I miss them, but mostly I miss YOU. I miss BOOK PEOPLE. With most events moved online right now, it can be easy to lose track BUT it can also be a lot easier to pop in and hear a favorite author speak about her new book, her old books, books she’s read, books she wishes she’d written or read. So as the April 13 launch of BITTERROOT LAKE (written as Alicia Beckman) approaches, watch for an occasional weekend email letting you know about events coming up the next week and how you can join me. Not every week, and only until early May; of course, you can find the full list of events on my website.

Sunday, March 28 at 2 E/noon Mtn: BookTuber (yes, it’s a word!) Tiffany Krieg will be interviewing me on her YouTube channel about cozy mysteries and more. The video will be archived so you can catch it later. Join via this link.

Tuesday, March 30 at 8 pm Mtn/7 pm Pacific: Join me and fellow NW cozy authors Emmeline Duncan, Ellie Alexander, and Angela Sanders for a book talk at Annie Bloom’s Books in Portland, OR. Register for the Livestream via this link. The first in Emmeline’s new series, FRESH BREWED MURDER, starring a terrific young woman who runs a coffee cart in Portland, launches that day; I’ve read it and it’s a lot of fun. Plus, we’re all a hoot, if I do say so myself, so you’ll have a great laugh and, I hope, discover some great new books and authors.

I hope to see you somewhere along the way.

The Saturday Creativity Quote — creating a sustainable practice

In the Clearwater Valley, pastel on suedeboard, by the author

We all know that showing up on the page, or the sketchbook, or the keyboard, is the only way to get the work done. But novelist and teacher Julianna Baggott points out that regular practice doesn’t just give you more pages or paintings or songs; it improves your skills and flow, and helps create the supportive community we all need.

“While creating pages at an ambitious rate, you’re also practicing strategies that help you block out distraction and get you to the page. You’re figuring out how to carve out time, to refresh and recharge, and then returning to the page. Perhaps you’re also learning how to move between projects. Maybe you’re teaching the people in your life that this discipline is important to you and that it will require some understanding and support on their part. In this way, you’re hopefully working toward a sustainable practice.”
– Julianna Baggott, Writer Unboxed 12/3/20

Writing Wednesday — dressing your characters

Once upon a time, we put on real clothes and went out into the world. Now a good chunk of us work from home in our torn jeans (and not fashionably torn), sweats, or yoga pants. Our characters, though, are still going about their business, running a Spice Shop in Seattle or a local foods grocer in Montana, and going all kinds of places. Which means that while I can grab the nearest thing on my closet shelf, I actually have to think about what they wear.

And because I live in a small town in western Montana, I don’t get to see the full range of clothing styles I could glimpse in just an hour sitting in the window of Starbucks on 5th Avenue in Seattle or nursing a cappuccino in a hip Missoula coffee house. When I do get out of town, I’m always looking, looking, looking. Turns out city lawyers don’t dress as formally as when I was a downtown Seattle lawyer—except when they do. There’s a lot wider range of styles and outfits these days.

Both physical magazines and catalogs and websites are a great source. Of course, you have to look beyond the companies you shop from. For Erin, my 32-year-old Montana girl, I browse Title 9, Athleta, REI, and other companies with an outdoor or “activewear” style. Her mother, Francesca, dresses from the pages of Soft Surroundings. For a special event, I’ve dressed characters from J. Peterman — take a look; the catalog copy itself is pretty wild. Pepper, who runs the Spice Shop in Pike Place Market, wears black yoga pants and T-shirts with her shop apron on workdays, but I let her go bright, bright, bright away from work, and on dry days, she loves to wear a pair of petal pink Mary Janes she splurged on in Assault & Pepper.

Bitterroot Lake

For Bitterroot Lake (coming April 13, written as Alicia Beckman), I thought about how different the four friends who are the focus of the story are. Sarah’s quite aware that her upscale Nordstrom look is right on par in her toney Seattle neighborhood, but a little out of place in Deer Park. Janine is a baker who’s showed up in town with only her work clothes. Sarah lends her clothes, but because of the tensions in their relationship, she’s self-conscious about it. Besides, everything’s too long. Nicole — Nic — is a lawyer whose workday wardrobe isn’t too different from the casual pants and fleece jackets she wears on her spur-of-the-moment, long-distance drive to Deer Park.

Dressing the men is even trickier. Around here, for men of a certain age — like the age of the man I’m married to — dressing up means a sport coat over Levi 501s and popping the dried mud off the cowboy boots. (Wear the ones with the nonskid soles this time of year.) Daily wear for the younger men tends toward cargo pants and T-shirts, although the “active wear” influence of the ski slopes and hiking trails is strong, too.

Think carefully about how your characters dress and what their clothing conveys about them. And do tell me some of your favorite tricks and sources for dressing your story people!

The Saturday Creativity Quote — the power of collaboration

The Barn, pastel on garnet paper, by the author

Writing, like a lot of other creative work, is often described as a solo activity. But there’s a strong case to be made for collaboration, as Joshua Wolf Shenk contends in the book Powers of Two: How Relationships Drive Creativity (2014; the original hardcover was titled Powers of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs). Shenk looks at artists and scientists working together — Lennon and McCartney, Marie and Pierre Curie — but also at artist and inspiration — Vincent and Theo Van Gogh — and scientists who worked and reworked their ideas in conversations with spouses, co-workers, even rivals, typically uncredited.

“So much of the creative exchange gets hidden. It happens offstage, and isn’t a part of history. Sometimes that’s due to prejudice, or ignorance, and sometimes it’s because, if things go well, you just don’t hear about the second person,” Shenk said in an interview in Vox.

For writers, think of the brainstorming sessions with a writing pal, email exchanges with an editor, even conversations with your S.O. about how to kill a character or how one character might behave in a particular situation.

Then take those ideas, spurred by an exchange, to your writing room and write them!

The Saturday Creativity Quote

Avalanche Creek, Glacier National Park (photo by the author)

“The first draft is for being brave. Try to save your restraint, and your caution, for the second and third drafts. … [quoting an unnamed screenwriter neighbor] ‘Caution is a thief. It robs the future of possibilities.’”

– Lauren Sancken, associate professor, University of Washington School of Law, Washington State Bar News, Jan 2020

The Mystery Hour — a live short story reading

Missing travel? Love a good mystery? Join me Monday evening, March 15, at 7 pm Mtn/ 9 pm Eastern for The Mystery Hour, sponsored by Authors Live Online. I’ll be reading “With My Eyes,” a 2019 Derringer Award winning short story originally published in Suspense Magazine. Inspired by a little woman my husband and I spotted at the Acropolis on our honeymoon trip more than 20 years ago, it features a lovesick man who sees what he wants to see.

My good friend Daryl Wood Gerber will be reading “No Final Act,” originally published in Mystery Most Theatrical, the 2020 Malice Domestic Anthology.

The event will be held on Zoom and live-streamed to Facebook Live. No technical skills needed — just get your free ticket from Authors Live Online and they’ll do the rest.

What could be more fun than a trip that doesn’t require shoes or hours crowded in an airplane? Pour a cup of tea or a glass of wine and join us!

Writing Wednesday — death investigations

Once upon a time, I wrote a book called Books, Crooks and Counselors: How to Write Accurately About Criminal Law and Courtroom Procedure (Linden/Quill Driver Books, 2011), winner of the 2011 Agatha Award for Best Nonfiction. One section discussed medical examiners and coroners, the two types of death investigation in the U.S. Since I had to look up a few details of Washington State’s system recently, I thought you might need a refresher, too.

Books, Crooks, and Councelors

Remember that terms and laws vary state by state. Whether your state uses a coroner, an ME, or a mix of the two, as Washington does, the role is the same: to investigate deaths as required by state law. As the Washington Association of Coroners and Medical Examiners says: “Coroners and medical examiners use the same forensic death scene investigation process,  forensic autopsies, toxicological testing and decedent histories to determine the cause and manner of death, resulting in consistent, professional and high quality death investigations.

Cause and manner. That’s their focus. In other words, what was the medical cause of death, and was it natural, accidental, suicide, homicide, undetermined, or pending. This summary from Washington’s Snohomish County website gives more detail on the five manners of death and specific considerations for each. Remember that particulars in your story state may vary. Coroners and ME’s don’t investigate the who and why—that’s up to law enforcement, whether it’s local police, a sheriff’s department, or a federal agency.

Coroners may be elected or appointed. In some states, they are independent, while in others, they are part of the country sheriff’s department. Medical examiners are typically medical doctors appointed to the position. Autopsies may be done within the department or done by forensic pathologists employed by a local hospital. Some states, like Montana, have a combined system where the sheriff is also the coroner, although a deputy may take on the primary responsibility, while autopsies and forensic examination are done by pathologists and forensics examiners at the state Crime Lab. How can you find out more about your story state’s system? Start here, with the CDC’s summary of Coroner/Medical Examiner Systems, by State; it also provides links to info for each state. The site also provides additional info that will intrigue crime writers. You might also glean useful details from the National Association of Medical Examiners website, including how to become a medical examiner, the violent death reporting system, and more.

Finally, the U.S. Department of Justice publishes this guide, Death Investigation: A Guide for the Scene Investigator, full of legal and other details for dealing with the body, the scene, medical history, and more.