Writing Wednesday — Dan Blank

Most of the books I’ve mentioned in the last few weeks have been reference books or craft guides. Today I want to spotlight Be the Gateway: A Practical Guide to Sharing Your Creative Work and Engaging an Audience, by Dan Blank (We Grow Media, 2017). I first encountered Blank and his work on Writer Unboxed, a terrific group blog that mixes writing craft, promotional advice, and inspiration. He no longer blogs there, but writes a weekly newsletter to which I subscribe. Blank works directly with writers to, as he says, “develop their author platforms, launch their books, and create marketing strategies that work.” (More on his website.) His newsletters and his book are not places to learn technical details of SEO, how to increase your Facebook following, or how to build a website. Instead, he focuses on giving writers ways to develop connections with their readers. As I said last week in raving about Donald Maass’s The Emotional Craft of Fiction, readers read in part for an emotional experience. If you give it to them on the page, they’ll read your next book. And if you market and promote your work with that same goal, istarting by dentifying your passions, why you write, and what experiences you want to give your readers, you’ll not only connect with them, you’ll enjoy the process.

Wow. Believe me, it’s true. That’s a big part of why I’m doing these Writing Wednesday posts. Sure, I hope you’ll buy my books. But I also want to share some of what I’ve learned in the process of writing and selling them you, and engage with you in the process. Because that’s a big part of why we’re driven to create, isn’t it?

Writing Wednesday — Garner’s Modern American Usage

Decades ago, in college, we were all required to buy Fowler’s Modern English Usage, originally published by H.G. Fowler but then in a 2d revised edition by Sir Ernest Gowers. It was brilliant, and it didn’t always make sense to my ears because — well, because I am an American. And my idea of “modern” wasn’t quite the same as old HG’s or Sir Ernest’s.

So I was elated to discover Garner’s Modern American Usage, by Bryan Garner, published by Oxford University. (Shown is the 3d edition, 2009). It’s modern. It’s American. And it’s just what every writer needs. It even includes a “language-change index” which does exactly what it says.

I am certain HG and Sir E would approve.

Writing Wednesday

Since last week was the launch of my tenth novel, The Solace of Bay Leaves, the 5th Spice Shop mystery, I figured it might be good, in talking about favorite references, to mention my first book, Books, Crooks and Counselors: How to Write Accurately About Criminal Law and Courtroom Procedure (Linden/Quill Driver, 2011). When I first joined authors’ groups, other writers asked me questions about the law—how would my detective get a search warrant, can this character inherit from that one, who is Miranda and why are we always warning her? Like DP Lyle’s Murder and Mayhem which I highlighted a couple of weeks ago, it’s aimed at mystery writers, but it’s equally useful for nonfiction writers, including journalists. 160 questions and answers in a dozen topics, illustrated with examples from real-life cases, including some of my own, and books and movies.

And yes, I still pull my own copy off the shelf now and then to remind myself of the facts about the law. Because even though it’s fiction, we owe our readers the truth.

By the way, Books and Crooks, as it’s known in my house, won the 2011 Agatha Award for Best Nonfiction. Such a special moment, because it told me I’d correctly identified a need and filled it. Though it’s been out several years, it is still largely accurate, though there have been quite a few developments in the law of the death penalty since then. Use this blog’s search function for some updates.

Writing Wednesday — putting words to the feelings

cat on desk

How I first found The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi (2012), I have no idea, but you can see that both the cat and I find it enormously useful, if for slightly different reasons.

The ability to identify and describe body language and facial expressions is critical in conveying emotion on the page. The authors list dozens of emotions, from adoration to worry, briefly define them, then set out physical signals, internal sensations, mental responses, and other key indicators. They also include a section on avoiding common problems, such as too much telling and cliches, and tips such as finding the root emotion, using the setting, and using visceral or instinctive reactions.

I use the lists as a starting point, thinking about a particular character, their personality, gender, how they use their body, how controlled or demonstrative they are, the intensity of the situation. You are the ultimate authority on your characters, but the authors’ lists will get the ideas moving. I’ve annotated my copy, listing additional emotions, adding observations of my own, and interleafing other resources. The authors have also written books on character traits, setting, and more. I see from their website, Writers Helping Writers, that they’ve put out a new edition of the Emotion Thesaurus. Maybe the cat will get me a copy for Christmas.

Writing Wednesday — our old reliables

Murder and Mayhem, with moose bookmark, lovingly crafted by my mother!

We’ve all got a collection of books we pull off the shelves over and over, references we rely on to help us find the right word, get the legal or medical details right, or figure out how to ramp up the emotional content of a scene. (“I said emotional content. Not anger,” as Bruce Lee said in Enter the Dragon.) Over the next few weeks, I’m going to highlight a few of mine. If you’ve got a favorite to recommend, please chime in in the comments.

Murder and Mayhem: A Doctor Answers Medical and Forensic Questions for Mystery Writers by D.P. Lyle (Thomas Dunne Books, 2003). A medical doctor who writes thrillers, TV tie-in novels with a medical theme, and books on forensics, Lyle also writes the “Forensic Files” column for the Mystery Writers of America answering questions for writers of both contemporary and historical crime novels. His blog, The Crime Fiction Writer’s Blog, is another terrific resource, often featuring fascinating guest bloggers from the worlds of medicine and science.

My copy of Murder and Mayhem barely fits in its slot on the shelf anymore, stuffed with articles and emails from Doug that I’ve printed out. When you need to know what drugs might cause cardiac arrest or what happens to body and brain when one character pushes another down the stairs or off a cliff, this is THE book.

And columns, book, and author were a big inspiration for me in writing my first book, Books, Crooks and Counselors: How to Write Accurately About Criminal Law and Courtroom Procedure (Linden/Quill Driver, 2011), a book that should be on YOUR shelves!

Why You Should Attend the Writers’ Police Academy – #WPA2016

WPA 2016If you write mystery or crime fiction, or romantic suspense, or anything where bad stuff happens, you need to know about police procedure and investigation, forensics, arson investigation, how PTSD affects law enforcement officers, emergency response teams, and all that stuff.

The best way to learn, hands down, is the Writers’ Police Academy, founded and run by Lee and Denene Lofland, with major sponsorship from Sisters in Crime. As you can tell from the photo, tThey make sitting in the BACK of a police car something to GRIN about!

The 2016 WPA was held at the Northeast Wisconsin Technical College outside of Green Bay, home to a terrific law enforcement training academy. It’s a hands-on, action-packed weekend. A few of the topics covered: Arson investigation; Asian and Native gangs; the Steven Avery investigation; ballistics; blood spatter (surprisingly popular!), courtroom testimony, common mistakes writers make about the law (I taught that one), death scene investigation, defense and arrest tactics, PTSD, drug ID, explosives, fire 101, force on force room clearing, forensic art, poisons, police talk, private investigation, undercover work, and more.

Hands-on sessions included driving, shooting, a shoot-don’t shoot scenario, and defense tactics. Each day, real-life scenarios were played out in front of us—a fatality collision, a stabbing on campus—so we could see who responded and what they did. The drone demo was great, and I’ll tell you, the SWAT armored vehicle is huge!

WPA 2016 2My personal favorite was the PIT maneuver driving class. I did it! I intentionally hit and spun another car! (Not easy for a personal injury lawyer to do that, but the instructor, Colleen Belongea, absolutely rocks!)

For perspective from other writers who attended, check out these blog posts:

Jessica Ellis Laine: Top Ten Reasons I Love the Writers’ Police Academy

Stacy Green: Writers Need the WPA Because Readers Are Smart

Terry O’Dell: Why Writers’ Police Academy? (This woman is serious—she’s attended 5 of the 8 WPAs!)

WPA Banquet photo #1I had a great time meeting so many Sisters in Crime—more than two-thirds of the attendees are members—and am gratified to know how valuable the experience is for Sisters, and others. (Banquet photo by Ohio Sister Jan Irvin.)

 

Planning for the 2017 WPA is underway. Watch the WPA website-–registration will open in February 2017.

My favorite writing books

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A reader spotted this photograph I’d posted of dictionaries and other references on my desk, and asked what books I think every writer should have. Besides Books, Crooks and Counselors, of course.

Language and style references:

A good dictionary and thesaurus, of course. In addition:

GarnerGarner’s Modern American Usage, Bryan Garner (Oxford; 3d Ed, 2009) Many of us remember the old Fowler’s Modern English Usage. This is better—smart, American, and up-to-date, by a lexicographer who shies not away from opining.

Chicago Manual of Style, a recent edition. Most publishers rely on the CSM, and if you use it, you can’t be accused of serious stylistic errors, even if some publishers or individuals have other preferences.

The Elements of Style, Strunk and White (various editions). The classic. Dated, maybe, but still a useful guide to many nuances of good writing.

The Emotion Thesaurus, Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi (2012) Readers read for emotion, but writers often use cliches and limited descriptions to show emotion in action. The lists of physical signals, internal sensations, mental responses, and more will help you deepen your writing and show the internal and external signs of emotion in stronger, fresher ways.

I also love the Oxford American Writer’s Thesaurus, in part for its essays on language and word meanings, but it isn’t an essential.

You should have a decent guide to grammar, as well. Contrary to your grade school recollections, they need not be dull. What’s most fun is to read not a prescriptive guide, but a volume or two by writers who clearly love the language and have strong opinions about it. I loved Constance Hale’s Sin and Syntax: How to Craft Wicked Good Prose; any of her books will be a fun read.

I was recently reminded of the late William Zinsser’s On Writing Well; it’s a classic, geared towards nonfiction, but helpful to all serious writers. I hear tell that there’s an audio version, read by Zinsser, perhaps abridged, that a friend enjoyed tremendously.

Writers should love words and cultivate an interest in them. My favorite sources won’t necessarily be yours, but I do think any serious writer needs to spend time simply playing with words and reading writers who play with them. Read poetry. Listen closely to song lyrics. Heck, do the crossword puzzle and play along with Will Shortz, NPR’s Puzzle Master. It’s all words.

Writing Craft:

Lately, I’ve been diving into James Scott Bell’s craft books for writers, and highly recommend them. Plot & Structure (Writers Digest, 2004) is a detailed guide to structure, with excellent sections on plot problems, how to generate ideas, and more. It’s a book to use over and over. Write Your Novel from the Middle (Compendium, 2014) explores Bell’s observation that the best stories have a “mirror moment” or midpoint shift in context; he shows how both plotters and pansters can find that moment, and write to and from it. How to Write Dazzling Dialogue (Compendium, 2014) is another winner, and I’m eager to dive into his new book on voice.

The Fire in Fiction and Writing the Breakout Novel, both by Donald Maass (Writers Digest, 2009 and 2001), are classics every writer should reread regularly. I’ve just started his Writing the 21st Century Novel (2012), and love, love, love his exercises and suggestions for diving deeper into character and emotion. If you like his columns on Writer Unboxed, you’ll recognize the approach—much of that material is here.

For something totally different: Ted Kooser’s The Poetry Home Repair Manual: Practical Advice for Beginning Poets (2007) is a slim volume I love for its lessons on meter and rhythm, on finding the right word and the exact meaning, and on learning to love working a line. I also enjoyed The Art of Description by poet Mark Doty.

Other faves:

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Write Away, by Elizabeth George. I took a week-long intensive writing workshop with her eons ago, and it changed my writing life.

Self-Editing for Writers, Renni Brown and Dave King

Reading Like a Writer, Francine Prose

IMGP3435For Mystery Writers: 

Lee Lofland’s Police Procedure and Investigation  (Writers Digest, 2007)

DP Lyle, Murder & Mayhem: A Doctor Answers Medical and Forenscis Questions for Mystery Writers The book that inspired me to write Books, Crooks & Counselors.

Adam Plantinga, 400 Things Cops Know (Linden/Quill Driver Books)

Inspiration:

tnWritesOfPassageYou know the usual suspects: Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird, Brenda Ueland’s If You Want to Write. And Steven Pressfield’s War of Art and other titles. A wonderful new entry is Writes of Passage: Adventures on the Writer’s Journey, ed. by Hank Phillippi Ryan, with essays by 60 members of Sisters in Crime, including me.

I find inspiration in reading a good writer. I hope you do, too.

More suggestions? Tell me in the comments.

Thinking about crowdfunding? Think first about the legal issues

Kickstarter. GoFundMe. Fundable. IndieGoGo. Donors Choose. Kiva. With each new crowdfund website I hear about, I wonder about some of the legal issues involved — and what the effect might be on individual artists and writers who fall afoul. Dan Lear’s blog post for the NW Lawyer, the Washington State Bar blog, Advising a Crowdfunded Creater: Avoiding Bob Ferguson’s Wrath, identifies some of the legal issues for creators who meet their fundraising goals but fail to follow through. Ferguson, the Washington State AG, and his office recently won a $50,000 fine against a creator funded through Kickstarter who failed to provide the promised goodies. The post is aimed at lawyers, but includes some tips for creators, and links to the cautionary tale.

I know you’ll never fail to keep your promises. But maybe one of your characters does, or gets in trouble using a crowdfunding source to raise capital for a business, which involves a whole other set of issues and regulations, or to raise money for litigation. It’s an area ripe for conflict, which makes it ripe for story.

I also spotted these articles or guides on crowdfunding for individuals, such as writers or artists. Do note, I’m providing these links to help you understand the issues; I do not vouch for the info provided, I am not providing legal advice, and reading this blog does not create a lawyer-client relationship — if you’ve got legal questions about crowdfunding, or heaven forbid, a problem, consult a lawyer in your own state who has the appropriate knowledge!

Legally Speaking, It Depends – Crowdfunding Legal and Business Issues, from Script Magazine, May 2014

Kickstarter Legal Guide, from a Portland OR law firm

The Problems and Promises of Crowdfunding, from Forbes Magazine, July 2013

 

New words in the dictionary — a quiz (part 2)

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At the Get Published Writers Conference in Bozeman this past June, where I was a speaker, my friend Lynn Kinnamon, the conference chair, shared these new words. All were published in the Merriam Website Online Dictionary in the last year or so. How many can you define?

 

8. sriracha (n)

9. vocal fry (n)

10. dark web

11. dox (v)

12. hyperlocal (n, adj)

13. lifehack (n)

14. microaggression

Part 1 last week

ANSWERS:

8. a hot sauce made of chile peppers, often used in Thai food; said SEE-rah-chah

9. the break in a voice when it drops to the lowest register; women tend to be criticized for it, and NPR reports that researchers have found some people view it as a sign of being untrustworthy

10. online, the hidden web, operating with masked ISPs and false, sometimes stolen, user names, usually for illicit ops, such as the child porn ring that stole a local man’s id, triggering a search warrant and much agony

11. to publish private info on line, without consent, to harass or cause trouble

12. not, as you might think, a very specific location or small community, but the practice of focusing on information directed at a specific community, such as a weekly newspaper that publishes info aimed at residents of a specific community and rarely comments on regional or national news

13. a tip for making life easier, like using plastic tags from bread bags to label power cords in the tangle behind your desk

14. In the words of Columbia University professor Derald Wing Sue, “the everyday verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs, or insults, whether intentional or unintentional, which communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages to target persons based solely upon their marginalized group membership.”

New words in the dictionary — a quiz (part 1)

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At the Get Published Writers Conference in Bozeman this past June, where I was a speaker, my friend Lynn Kinnamon, the conference chair, shared these new words. All were published in the Merriam Website Online Dictionary in the last year or so. How many can you define?

 

1. NSFW (abbreviation)

2. jeggings (n)

3. photobomb (v)

4. eggcorn (n)

5. emoji (n)

6. click fraud (n)

7. upcycle (v)

Part 2 in two weeks 

ANSWERS:

1. Not Suitable For Work

2. denim leggings

3. to appear, uninvited but on purpose, in a photograph

4. words or a phrase commonly misheard, e.g., misunderstood lyrics; comes from the word acorn.

5. symbol used in email or text messages to express an emotion not conveyed by the words themselves

6. deliberately clicking on an online advertisement repeatedly, to cost the advertiser money or drain their pre-set ad budget; a nasty thing to do

7. to make something new out of trash, such as sewing a skirt out of old t-shirts or cutting and polishing a wine bottle to make a tumbler